Wednesday April 23 , 2014
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Testimonials

Angelo Henderson was inspiring.

 

Garry D. Howard, editor-in-chief, Sporting News

We met in St. Petersburg way back in 1986 and Angelo Henderson was inspiring. As an up-and-coming sports copy editor, I had designs on one day running my own sports department, and Mr. Henderson believed in me—even back then.

He would offer support and anecdotes, introduce me to other journalists who might offer some insight and just became a great friend and trusted colleague.

He is brilliant, a writer's writer and and has a smooth touch that was evident even before he won a Pulitzer Prize.

More important, in my estimation, is his commitment to an organization that has helped each and every one of us realize our journalistic dreams.

 

Articles by Angelo

Beyond the Statistics, A Druggist Confronts The Reality of Robbery

Ripped Off Once, Mr. Grehl Got a Gun, Vowing Not To Be a Victim Again Eye to Eye With `Yo Roller'

By Angelo B. Henderson

from the 01/20/1998 The Wall Street Journal Page A1
(Copyright (c) 1998, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

Winner of the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing

DETROIT - "Get on the ground," a man holding a gun screamed. "I'll blow your heads off if you move."

Dennis Grehl and a co-worker complied. Dreamlike, he found himself lying face down on a cold, gritty black-tile floor, a pistol against the back of his head.

Read more: Beyond the Statistics, A Druggist Confronts The Reality of Robbery

 

Bart's Story: A Detroit Kidnapping Shines a Grim Light On a Mutating Crime

Abductions, Once Targeting The Rich, Have Turned Into “Lazy Man’s” Felony—A Chilling Third-World Echo

By Angelo B. Henderson
Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal

3,688 words, 17 April 2001, The Wall Street Journal, English
(Copyright (c) 2001, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

DETROIT—When a gunman toting an AK-47 and another man with a metal baseball bat barged in to the Coney Island Diner on this city's crime-tossed east side, patrons at first thought it was a robbery. Everybody dove for cover but, in fact, the men weren't looking for money.

They were looking for 17-year-old Carl " Bart" Simpson.

Read more: Bart's Story: A Detroit Kidnapping Shines a Grim Light On a Mutating Crime

 

For Tone Caruthers, a Quick Raid and Slow Torture

By Angelo B. Henderson

1,120 words, 17 April 2001, The Wall Street Journal, English
(Copyright (c) 2001, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

On a chilly September night, Venus Butler's telephone rang. It was almost 1 a.m. A man whispered, "Baby, these guys got me. They're going to kill me."

Read more: For Tone Caruthers, a Quick Raid and Slow Torture

 

A Clerk’s Salary, an Expensive Lifestyle, Then a Night of Terror

By Angelo B. Henderson

765 words, 17 April 2001, The Wall Street Journal, English
(Copyright (c) 2001, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

Gena Wright's parents say she died for the worst of all reasons: She fell in love with, and trusted, the wrong man.

Read more: A Clerk’s Salary, an Expensive Lifestyle, Then a Night of Terror

 

In Detroit, Blacks Turn the Staid Obit Into a Glossy Art

Minimagazines Sprout Up, Dishing Virtue and Candor; A Poem Raps a Gangster

By Angelo B. Henderson

Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal
1,547 words, 1 May 2000, The Wall Street Journal, English
(Copyright (c) 2000, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

DETROIT—Some people rate an obituary. And then some people rate an entire magazine.

Take Canary Williams Simmons.

The sociable, fun-loving Ms. Simmons died here unexpectedly of pneumonia on Jan. 8 at the age of 54. But she looms larger than life on the cover of a glossy, 10-page, full-color magazine produced by her family. She sits in a director's chair with a studio impresario's stare, her silvery pantsuit glittering. The backdrop: a painting of an emerald Rolls-Royce.

Read more: In Detroit, Blacks Turn the Staid Obit Into a Glossy Art

 

`Fantasy' Stylists Go Toe to Toe, and It's Really Hair-Raising

Contests Can Be Quite Moving, Thanks to Mr. Motor Hair; That Certain Python Look

By Angelo B. Henderson
Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal

1,359 words, 18 April 1996, The Wall Street Journal, English
(Copyright (c) 1996, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

DETROIT—The city that gave the world tail fins and the Supremes is suddenly giving it something else

A new definition of Big Hair.

Consider the contribution of Willie Robinson. Competing in one of a recent spate of hair-styling competitions, Mr. Robinson, a local stylist, paraded on stage with his model. She was perhaps 5-foot-2. Her hair was perhaps 2-foot-5, and bound together by a zipper. It swooped upward in a towering wave known as a French roll.

Read more: `Fantasy' Stylists Go Toe to Toe, and It's Really Hair-Raising

 

Pitching Used Cars On Church Fans Isn’t Holy Inappropriate

Once the Advertising Realm Of Mortuaries, Devices Get a Much Livelier Look

By Angelo B. Henderson
Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal

1,236 words, 22 May 1996, The Wall Street Journal, English
(Copyright (c) 1996, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

First the pearly gates.

Now, the golden arches.

This has O'Neil Swanson Sr. worried. Mr. Swanson is prominent in the Detroit mortuary business. For decades he and other funeral-home operators had an exclusive if arcane advertising window to the faithful: the church fan.

Read more: Pitching Used Cars On Church Fans Isn’t Holy Inappropriate

 

Death Watch? Black Funeral Homes Fear a Gloomy Future As Big Chains Move In

White Companies Target Inner Cities, Churches In Push for New Markets—Rumors Fly in Los Angeles

By Angelo B. Henderson
Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal

2,184 words, 18 July 1997, The Wall Street Journal, English
(Copyright (c) 1997, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

Is the black-owned, family-run funeral home destined for a slow death?

For Hugh Winstead Jr., who runs his family's 60-year-old funeral parlor in Louisville, Ky., this isn't merely a matter of historical interest.

Read more: Death Watch? Black Funeral Homes Fear a Gloomy Future As Big Chains Move In

 

Color Code: Black Entrepreneurs Face a Perplexing Issue: How to Pitch to Whites

Some Prefer a Low Profile, Often Using Stand-Ins For Suburban Campaigns—Choosing a Caucasian Clone

By Angelo B. Henderson
Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal

2,813 words, 26 January 1999, The Wall Street Journal, English
(Copyright (c) 1999, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

DETROIT—When suburban clients close a deal with First Impressions Inc., they will probably shake hands with William Ashley or someone else who is white, although Eric Giles, who is African-American, did the client research, helped develop the sales strategy and made initial telephone contact for this restaurant and food-service employment agency.

Read more: Color Code: Black Entrepreneurs Face a Perplexing Issue: How to Pitch to Whites

 

An Easter Bonnet With Frills Upon It Is Decidedly Old Hat

At St. Stephen Baptist Church In Louisville, Ky., They Won’t Dress Up This Year

By Angelo B. Henderson and Robert McGough Staff Reporters of The Wall Street Journal
1,138 words, 7 April 1998, The Wall Street Journal, English (Copyright (c) 1998, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

Easter Sunday is the dressiest day of the Christian religious year. That's certainly true among African-Americans. But at predominantly black St. Stephen Baptist Church in Louisville, Ky., Easter is a dress-down day. The attire: T-shirts, jeans, jogging suits, gym shoes or anything casual.

Read more: An Easter Bonnet With Frills Upon It Is Decidedly Old Hat

 

Jarrett’s Years as a Journalist, as an Educator

by Angelo B. Henderson, Associate Editor, Real Times

He challenged us, chastised us and changed us as Black people.

Vernon Jarrett wasn’t afraid to fight for us. In fact, he was created to do just that—not with his hands, but with his head.

Strategic. Uncompromising. Fearless.

Read more: Jarrett’s Years as a Journalist, as an Educator

 

‘Pukey Green’ Fast Loses Ground To Mauve in Hospital Scrub Suits

By Angelo B. Henderson

Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal

426 words, 20 June 1984, The Wall Street Journal, English
(Copyright (c) 1984, Dow Jones & Co., Inc.)

Nurse Leslie Green hates the “pukey green potato sack” she has to wear in the Buffalo General Hospital operating room.

Scrub suits have traditionally been made of bedsheets dyed green and cut into baggy unisex patterns. They're made to last. Hospitals generally buy seven to nine changes a person and replace them after two years or at least 100 washings. And until a few years ago, doctors and nurses like Miss Green had no reason to expect their new scrubs to be anything different.

Read more: ‘Pukey Green’ Fast Loses Ground To Mauve in Hospital Scrub Suits

 

Looking for a Good Gourmet Meal? You Might Try the Local Hospital

By Angelo B. Henderson
Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal

428 words, 1 June 1984, The Wall Street Journal, English
(Copyright (c) 1984, Dow Jones & Co., Inc.)

Susan London recently had a fancy meal: wild-rice soup, skewered marinated vegetables, chateaubriand with a dry California wine and the chef's special cheesecake.
The place? Mt. Sinai Hospital in Minneapolis, where Mrs. London spent two weeks for arm surgery and related complications. "I was very surprised," says Mrs. London. "Most hospitals don't have very good food; everybody knows that."

Read more: Looking for a Good Gourmet Meal? You Might Try the Local Hospital

 

Can Michael Jackson Sell a Casino Plan To Detroit Voters?

Rejected Developer Hopes So, But Mayor Isn't Thrilled; A Bubble-Enclosed Ride

By Angelo B. Henderson
Staff Reporter of The Wall Street Journal

633 words, 8 July 1998, The Wall Street Journal, English
(Copyright (c) 1998, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.)

DETROIT—One of the losers in the poker game for a casino license here is trying to play Michael Jackson as a wild card.

Read more: Can Michael Jackson Sell a Casino Plan To Detroit Voters?

 

Mazda Cuts Output as Troubles Mount—Exports Also Are Slashed To Cope With Cash Crunch

By Valerie Reitman and Angelo B. Henderson

Staff Reporters of The Wall Street Journal
1,027 words, 26 April 1995, The Wall Street Journal, English
(Copyright (c) 1995, Dow Jones & Co., Inc.)


Mazda Motor Corp., in a sign that its troubles are worsening, said it will cut car production in Japan by 22% this quarter and slash its exports by half.

The move signals deepening problems at the Japanese auto maker, in which Ford Motor Co. has a 25% stake. Mazda now faces a serious cash-flow crunch, according to a senior company manager who asked not to be named. And if the yen remains at current high levels, Mazda's plight will intensify. "If the yen does not weaken, it will be hard to survive," the executive said.

That's not a comforting feeling for Ford.

Read more: Mazda Cuts Output as Troubles Mount—Exports Also Are Slashed To Cope With Cash Crunch